Illinois Mesothelioma Information | Surviving Mesothelioma

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Illinois Mesothelioma Info

By clicking on the above tabs, you will find information on mesothelioma specific to the state of Illinois

Illinois Research and Clinical Trials

This is a partial list of scientific or medical grants in your state for research into mesothelioma and related illnesses.

Illinois Doctors and Hospitals

This is a partial list of hospitals and physicians that reportedly treat mesothelioma patients in your state.

Illinois Cases

This is a partial list of relevant court cases on mesothelioma in your state.

Disclaimer: Inclusion on this directory does not constitute endorsement by Cancer Monthly, Inc. All physicians who appear in this section do so based on their own expression of interest in the fields of mesothelioma treatment. Cancer Monthly, Inc. has not verified the competence, professional credentials, business practices or validity of the expressed interests of these physicians. Cancer Monthly makes no recommendation of any physician on this list and makes no suggestion that any such physician will cure or prevent any disease. Those consulting a physician on this list should approach the consultation exactly as they would with any other unknown physician.

Research

Abstract:DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The broad, long term objective of the proposed research is to develop a fully automated, computerized system that will assist radiologists in the quantitative assessment of pleural-based diseases in helical computed tomography (CT) scans. The objective disease quantification that such a system would produce is expected to provide valuable information regarding disease progression or the response of disease to treatment. This information would be used to guide patient treatment or gauge the efficacy of therapeutic agents during clinical trials. This specific study will focus on one particular pleural-based disease, malignant pleural mesothelioma. Radiologists must inspect the anatomic region between the lungs and the chest wall or the mediastinum on CT scans to evaluate the extent of mesothelioma, which presents as a thickening of the pleura. Currently, assessment of mesothelioma severity is based on manual measurements of the pleural thickness made at several image locations; this approach represents a coarse, tedious process that suffers from subjectivity and variability among observers who make the measurements. The development of automated and semi- automated methods that, in each hemithorax of a CT scan, delineate the lung border, delineate the chest wall and mediastinum, and quantify the differences between these anatomical structures as a measure of pleural thickness, is expected to facilitate the efficient, objective assessment of pleural thickness for the evaluation of mesothelioma tumor. The utility of such consistent methods is accentuated by their application to temporally sequential scans, in which a comparison of tumor size over time is made to determine the rate of disease progression or the response of disease to a specific treatment regimen. The hypothesis of this study is that computerized techniques can be developed to assist radiologists and clinicians in the reliable, consistent, and reproducible quantification of mesothelioma tumor as an objective parameter for initial staging and subsequent treatment response.

Tags:Computed Axial Tomography, Computer Assisted Medical Decision Making, Computer Program /software, Computer System Design /evaluation, Health Science Profession, Mesothelioma, Neoplasm /cancer Diagnosis, Radiology Anatomy, Lung, Morphology, Thoracic Radiography Bioimaging /biomedical Imaging, Human Data

  • Followup Grant: 5R01CA102085-02
  • Followup Grant: 5R01CA102085-03
  • Followup Grant: 5R01CA102085-04
  • Followup Grant: 3R01CA102085-01A3S1
  • Followup Grant: 3R01CA102085-02S1
  • Followup Grant: 3R01CA102085-02S2

Abstract: DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Simian virus 40 (SV40 is a DNA virus which specifically induces mesotheliomas, ependymomas, sarcomas and osteosarcomas in rodents. These same tumor types contain SV40 sequences in humans, but the role of SV40 in human carcinogenesis is unknown. We are investigating if SV40 contributes to the development of human mesothelioma, a very aggressive tumor of the pleura whose incidence continues to increase. Mesothelioma is strongly associated with asbestos exposure, but only 5-10 percent of workers exposed to high levels of asbestos develop this tumor, and about 20 percent of mesotheliomas patients have not been exposed to asbestos. It would be very important to find the co-factor/s that render some workers more susceptible to asbestos or that cause mesothelioma in individuals who have not been exposed to asbestos. We propose to investigate the mechanisms that make mesothelial cells very susceptible to SV40-mediated transformation, and their possible relevance to human malignant mesothelioma. During the previous grant period, we established the possible biological significance of SV40 when present in some human mesotheliomas, and the utility of an in vitro SV40-human mesothelial cell system for studying this association. We propose to build on these studies to identify: 1) the natural history of SV40 infection in humans, 2) the mechanisms that cause the frequent immortalization of mesothelial cells following infection with SV40, 3) the mechanisms which may account for the presence of the more rapidly replicating non-archetypal SV40 in mesotheliomas, compared to the less rapidly replicating archetypal SV40 in ependymomas and bone tumors, and whether these mechanisms are related to oncogenesis.

Tags: Mesothelioma, Neoplastic Transformation, Simian Virus 40, Viral Carcinogenesis, Virus Genetics Athymic Mouse, Human Tissue, Neoplasm /cancer Transplantation, Nucleic Acid Sequence, Tissue /cell Culture

  • Followup Grant: 5R01CA092657-02
  • Followup Grant: 5R01CA092657-03
  • Followup Grant: 5R01CA092657-04
  • Followup Grant: 5R01CA092657-05

Abstract:DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Our hypothesis is that asbestos and SV40 are co-carcinogens in causing malignant mesothelioma (MM). This hypothesis is based on in vitro experiments using human mesothelial cells (HM) and in vivo experiments in hamsters. We found that neither asbestos nor SV40 small t antigen mutants could cause HM malignant transformation. However, when HM were exposed to both asbestos and SV40 small t mutants, malignant transformation and focus formation occurred. Moreover, preliminary results demonstrated a potent co-carcinogenic effect in hamsters coinjected with SV40 small t mutant intracardially and with asbestos intrapleurally and intraperitoneally. Our findings suggest that individuals exposed to both asbestos and SV40 are at increased risk of developing mesothelioma. Here we want to study the mechanisms of co-carcinogenesis. We propose to conduct these studies in human and in hamster mesothelial cells in tissue culture, and in hamster and human mesothelioma biopsies. In Aim 1 we will determine the biological effect of TNF-alpha, PDGF and TGF- beta in SV40-asbestos co-carcinogenesis in HM in tissue culture. In preliminary results we found that our mesothelial cells express receptors for these cytokines. We also found that TNF-alpha expression and receptor are induced in HM following asbestos exposure or SV40 infection. HM exposure to TNF-alpha induced NF-kbeta activation which plays an important role in oncogenesis. In parallel we are studying the effect of SV40 and asbestos on the Ras-ERK pathways and AP-1 induction, because we found that both, SV40 and asbestos induce ERK1/2 and downstream effectors in HM in tissue culture. Our hypothesis is that all these mechanisms are inter-related and we will study the biological significance of these mechanisms in SV40-asbestos co-carcinogenesis. In Aim 2A, the same cytokines and gene pathways studied in Aim 1, will be investigated in frozen specimens from MM we induced in hamster with asbestos, SV40, and SV40 small t mutant plus asbestos, and the results compared. By comparing the in vitro data (aim I), with those produced in an experimental MM model (Aim 2A) in which exposure, was under our control, we will identify among many possible candidate gene pathways, those that are most relevant to MM pathogenesis and to SV40-asbestos pathogenesis and co-carcinogenesis. The results will be validated by studying the same cytokines and gene pathways identified in vitro (Aim 1) and in hamster MM (aim 2A) in a unique collection of 38 frozen MM biopsies and matching lung tissue (Aim 2B). In these 38 samples we have determined SV40 status and type and amount of asbestos exposure. Finally, in Aim 3 we will attempt to establish an SV40-asbestos mouse tumor model, similar to the one we established in hasmters. The availability of a mouse model would be ideal for future mechanistic and experimental therapeutic approaches because of the large number of mouse reagents (monoclonals, transgenic mice, knock-out mice, etc.). It is anticipated that the results of the experimens proposed in this application will provide information to design novel preventive and therapeutic approaches for MM.

Tags: Asbestos, Chemical Carcinogenesis, Cocarcinogen, Mesothelioma, Simian Virus 40, Viral Carcinogenesis Cytokine Receptor, Disease /disorder Model, Guanine Nucleotide Binding Protein, Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase, Nuclear Factor Kappa Beta, Platelet Derived Growth Factor, Protooncogene, Transforming Growth Factor, Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Genetically Modified Animal, Hamster, Human Tissue, Laboratory Mouse, Tissue /cell Culture

  • Followup Grant: 5R01CA106567-02

Abstract:We propose to 1) Determine the origin of SV40-like sequences in human tumors; 2) Investigate if these viral sequences contribute to carcinogenesis; 3) Study if the expression of viral sequences can be used to develop new diagnostic approaches for mesothelioma and osteosarcoma patients. We will investigate the possible role of SV40-like DNA sequences in the development of human mesotheliomas and osteosarcomas. We will sequence, by PCR, the entire viral genome present in mesotheliomas and in osteosarcomas to determine how much of the viral genome is present in these human tumors and whether it is identical to the SV40 genome or mutated. We will attempt to isolate and sequence the SV40-like viruses from human mesotheliomas and osteosarcomas by transfecting DNAs from these tumors into permissive CV1 monkey cells. Next, we will investigate human biopsies by PCR, Northern and Western blot experiments, and immunohistochemistry, to determine if the SV40-like antigen (Tag) produced in human mesotheliomas binds and inactivates the cellular tumor suppressor proteins known to bind Tag in tissue culture: p53, Rb, pRb2, p107, p300. In addition, we will investigate by immunoperoxidase and Western blot experiments if the high level of c-fos expression we found in poor-risk osteosarcoma patients are induced by SV40-like in these tumors. Because SV40 small t antigen (tag) induces -fos in monkey cells in culture, we will transfect tag into human osteosarcoma cells in culture to test if tag can induce c-fos expression also in these cells. We will also investigate if the presence of SV40-like sequences in malignant mesothelioma cells can represent a useful marker for the pathologist for confirming, using PCR amplification, the often difficult morphologic diagnosis of mesothelioma.

Tags:Mesothelioma, Nucleic Acid Sequence, Osteosarcoma, Simian Virus 40, Viral Carcinogenesis, Virus Dna Biomarker, Diagnosis Design /evaluation, Molecular Oncology, Neoplasm /cancer Diagnosis, Protooncogene, Tumor Suppressor Protein Human Tissue, Immunocytochemistry, Immunoperoxidase, Northern Blotting, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Tissue /cell Culture, Transfection, Western Blotting

  • Followup Grant: 5R29CA077220-02
  • Followup Grant: 5R29CA077220-03
  • Followup Grant: 5R29CA077220-04
  • Followup Grant: 5R29CA077220-05

Abstract:The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) has been engaged in a clinical research project to develop staging classifications for cancers of all anatomic sites. Imminent directives for the AJCC derive from its past accomplishments of publication of three editions of the Manual for Staging Cancer. A new governance for the AJCC is stability in staging. Planned future activities of the AJCC include: 1. Refine present recommendations through comparisons with other established systems for staging and adjustments, where justified, to make compatible, i.e., pediatric tumors and gynecologic sites. 2. Identify variances and reaching accommodations between the staging systems of the AJCC and the International Union Against Cancer (UICC). Future publications of both organizations will reflect these reconciliations. 3. Continue studying the importance of molecular markers and prognostic indices and their role in staging. 4. Explore means and methods to encourage acceptance and use of the staging classifications and vigorously promote the value and use of the system in research protocols, medical schools, residency training programs, clinical practice, research, publications, and end-results reporting. 5. Investigate the need and feasibility of publishing articles on staging of cancer at specific sites or for certain physiologic systems, i.e., genitourinary and gynecologic, to accommodate the specialties of oncology practice and to encourage use of the staging classifications. 6. Develop staging schemes in accordance with national and international groups for the following sites: Kaposi’s sarcoma, spinal cord, small intestine, mesotheliomas, fallopian tube, malignant carcinoid tumors, and tumors metastatic to the brain and liver. 7. Refine, publicize, distribute, and encourage the use of site- specific, cancer data collection forms.

Tags: Cancer Information System, Information Dissemination, Neoplasm /cancer Classification /staging Kaposi’s Sarcoma, Biomarker, Brain Neoplasm, Data Collection, Female Reproductive System Neoplasm, Intestine Neoplasm, Liver Neoplasm, Mesothelioma, Metastasis, Prognosis, Publication, Spinal Cord Neoplasm

  • Followup Grant: 5R01CA011606-22

Abstract:

  • Followup Grant: 3R01CA011606-23S1

Abstract:

  • Followup Grant: 5R21CA091122-02

Abstract:The research project describes the components of the basic and clinical research capabilities of the University of Health Sciences/The Chicago Medical School and its potential value to the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group. The objective of the program is to continue to provide the clinical resources of a university service which is complemented by an extensive network of community hospitals. The clinical faculty in the Medical, Surgical, Gynecological, and Radiation Oncological subspecialties interact closely with pathologists and immunologists at the Medical School and provide valuable multidisciplinary resources to ECOG. The availability of NMR scanning, E.M. and Cytogenetic laboratories added to the immunological expertise within the program provides capabilities to participate in a wide range of group activities including the testing of the role of the various immunomodifiers in cancer treatment. Data derived from important studies involving the treatment of malignant mesotheliomas and favorable non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas are continuing to be analyzed and new treatment approaches devised. The University of Health Sciences/The Chicago Medical School has now developed several areas of excellence which should be of great value to the present and future activities of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group.

Tags: Cancer Clinical Investigation Review Committee, Neoplasms Immunization (immunotherapy), Neoplastic Therapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Alkaloids, Vincristine, Antibiotics, Amphotericin-b, Antibiotics, Bleomycin, Blood Cells, T Lymphocytes, Blood Cells, T Lymphocytes, Helper, Blood Cells, T Lymphocytes, Suppressor, Blood Proteins Disorders, Macroglobulinemia, Waldenstrom’s, Drugs, Pharmacology, Biochemical, Estratriene Series, Estrogens, Folic Acid Antagonists, Methotrexate, Genetics, Cytogenetics, Haloalkylamines, Cyclophosphamide, Halopyrimidines, Halouracil, Fluorouracil, Imidazoles, Levamisole, Immunology, Transfer Factor, Mycoses, Moniliasis, Neoplasms Of Blood And Re System, Bone Marrow Neoplasms, Multiple Myeloma, Neoplasms Of Blood And Re System, Hodgkin’s Disease, Neoplasms Of Blood And Re System, Leukemia Lymphocytic, Neoplasms Of Blood And Re System, Lymphoma, Histiocytic Lymphoma, Neoplasms Of Blood And Re System, Lymphosarcoma, Neoplasms Of Body Cavities, Mesothelioma, Neoplasms Of Gastrointestinal System, Neoplasms Of Reproductive System Male, Prostate Neoplasms, Neoplasms Of Reproductive System, Breast Neoplasms, Neoplasms Of Respiratory System, Lung Neoplasms, Neoplasms, Cancer Complications Of, Infections, Neoplastic Therapy, Antineoplastic Agents, Neoplastic Therapy, Cancer Chemotherapy, Hormone Therapy, Pigment Cell Neoplasms, Melanoma, Therapy Evaluation, Triazines, Hexamethylmelamine, Cooperative Study Chemistry, Analytical Methods, Spectrometry, Nmr, Dosage And Route, Route Of Administration, Human, Clinical, Tissue (cell) Culture

  • Followup Grant: 5U10CA014144-14
  • Followup Grant: 5U10CA014144-15
  • Followup Grant: 5U10CA014144-16

Abstract:Loyola has made significant scientific contributions to the Southwest Oncology Group during this institution’s first grant cycle. Five faculty members have served as Chairs of committees or subcommittees: Dr. Fisher, Chairman, Lymphoma Committee; Dr. Albain, Chairperson, Committee on Women’s Health; Dr. Flanigan, Chairman, Renal Subcommittee; Dr. Herman, Chairman, Flow Cytometry Subcommittee; and Dr. Sosman, Vice-Chairman, Melanoma Biology Subcommittee. As such they have been responsible for developing the scientific initiatives of their committees. Twelve Loyola faculty have served as either Principal Coordinator or Co-coordinator for 43 protocols. Eighteen of these protocols were developed based on pilot studies conducted by Loyola investigators, particularly those involving Phase II drug development and the lymphomas. As a result of their scientific contributions, Loyola faculty have been authors on 20 published manuscripts and 17 abstracts. Loyola’s increasing administrative and scientific contributions are documented in the “Summary of Contributions” reports issued annually by SWOG: Loyola has moved from an average third quartile ranking in these categories in 1988 to an average first quartile ranking in 1990 and 1991. Loyola also believes that it has made a strong contribution to SWOG scientific activities through its accrual of large number of eligible and evaluable patients to SWOG clinical trials. The number of Loyola registrations has increased significantly in the last two years. Loyola SWOG registrations ranged from 86 to 98 from 1987 to 1989, but rose to 148 in 1990 and 144 in 1991. Between 82 to 87% of these registrations come from the member institution hospitals. Furthermore the current accrual figures do not represent the full accrual potential of the two newest member institution hospitals. MacNeal has accrued patients only in the second half of 1991 and Illinois Masonic accrual will begin in 1992. Finally the quality of data is demonstrated by the fact that throughout this grant cycle the percent of eligible and evaluable patients has ranged from 91 to 100. Support is requested for continued group participation and data management during the next grant cycle.

Tags:Combination Antineoplastic Therapy, Combination Chemotherapy, Neoplasm /cancer Chemotherapy, Neoplasm /cancer Immunotherapy, Neoplasm /cancer Radiation Therapy, Neoplasm /cancer Surgery Hodgkin’s Disease, Acute Myelogenous Leukemia, Adenocarcinoma, Antineoplastic, Bone Marrow Transplantation, Brain Neoplasm, Breast Neoplasm, Carmustine, Cis Platinum Compound, Clinical Study /trial, Colony Stimulating Factor, Cooperative Study, Cyclophosphamide, Cytosine Arabinoside, Epidermoid Carcinoma, Etoposide, Gastrointestinal Neoplasm, Glioma, Head /neck Neoplasm, Human Therapy Evaluation, Hydroxyurea, Interferon Alpha, Interleukin 2, Kidney Neoplasm, Lung Neoplasm, Lymph Node Neoplasm, Lymphoma, Melanoma, Mesothelioma, Multiple Myeloma, Neoplasm /cancer Relapse /recurrence, Neoplasm /cancer Remission /regression, Nephrectomy, Nonhodgkin’s Lymphoma, Ovary Neoplasm, Pancreas Neoplasm, Passive Immunization, Postmenopause, Prognosis, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Sarcoma, Small Cell Carcinoma Of Lung, Stomach Neoplasm, Tamoxifen, Uterus Neoplasm Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter, Human Subject

  • Followup Grant: 5U10CA046282-07
  • Followup Grant: 5U10CA046282-08
  • Followup Grant: 5U10CA046282-10

Abstract:DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Evanston Northwestern Healthcare has over 20 years of successful participation as an NCI-designated CCOP. Over these years we have met or exceeded clinical trial accrual goals, held leadership positions in our research bases, directed national cooperative group studies and brought to the cooperative groups our experience and expertise in many areas such as quality-of-life research, thoracic and breast oncology, neuro-oncology and recently cancer genetics. Evanston Northwestern Healthcare has the only tertiary care oncology program in our area (population >1.2 million) with consistent participation in NCI-approved cancer treatment, prevention and control studies. We are the major supplier of oncologic healthcare in our area, and a major force for health education and promotion. The specific aims of this renewal proposal are: 1. To continue to offer the populations of the North suburbs of Chicago state-of-the-art clinical research trials covering cancer treatment, control, and prevention. 2. To extend our efforts into Lake County, Illinois (population 661,000), one of the fastest growing communities in the Midwest and until now not served by any medical institution with consistent participation in NIH-approved clinical trials in oncology. 3. To disseminate within our catchment area state-of-the-art clinical practice in oncology as an outgrowth of our participation in the CCOP programs. 4. To bring to our national research bases expertise and proposals based on the ongoing research programs and clinical strengths of Evanston Northwestern Healthcare, and reflecting the needs of our community. 5. To expand our cancer treatment, prevention and control efforts to underserved and minority populations. 6. To continue our leadership positions in our established national research bases and to offer leadership in our new research base.

Tags:Cancer Prevention, Community Health Service, Human Therapy Evaluation, Neoplasm /cancer Therapy Hodgkin’s Disease, Waldenstrom’s Macroglobulinemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Antineoplastic, Bladder Neoplasm, Bone Marrow Transplantation, Brain Neoplasm, Breast Neoplasm, Breast Neoplasm /cancer Diagnosis, Cancer Pain, Cancer Registry /resource, Cancer Rehabilitation /care, Cervix Neoplasm, Chemoprevention, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Clinical Trial, Colon Neoplasm, Colorectal Neoplasm, Combination Cancer Therapy, Combination Chemotherapy, Cooperative Study, Data Management, Disease /disorder Prevention /control, Early Diagnosis, Esophagus Neoplasm, Gastrointestinal Neoplasm, Head /neck Neoplasm, Leukemia, Lung Neoplasm, Lymphoma, Medically Underserved Population, Melanoma, Mesothelioma, Multiple Myeloma, Neoplasm /cancer Chemotherapy, Neoplasm /cancer Diagnosis, Neoplasm /cancer Education, Neoplasm /cancer Immunotherapy, Neoplasm /cancer Radiation Therapy, Neoplasm /cancer Surgery, Nonhodgkin’s Lymphoma, Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer, Ovary Neoplasm, Pleural Neoplasm, Prostate Neoplasm, Rectum Neoplasm, Sarcoma, Uterus Neoplasm Behavioral /social Science Research Tag, Clinical Research, Health Services Research Tag, Human Subject, Medical Rehabilitation Related Tag

  • Followup Grant: 5U10CA035199-24
  • Followup Grant: 5U10CA035199-26
  • Followup Grant: 2U10CA035199-20
  • Followup Grant: 5U10CA035199-21
  • Followup Grant: 5U10CA035199-22

Abstract:DESCRIPTION: (Applicant’s Description) Evanston Hospital Corporation which has been renamed as Evanston Northwestern Health care (ENH), has been a CCOP since 1093 and has participated in studies of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG), the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Program (NSABP), and propose to accrue patients to the Gynecology Oncology Group (GOG). It accrued 259 patients with 272 credits to therapeutic trials between June of 1992 to May of 1997. ENH also contributed non-COP patients to NIH-sponsored studies on brain tumors. ENH investigators have chaired ECOG protocols in genitourinary, breast, and hematologic malignancies. They have also chaired steering committees and served in leadership roles in these groups. Currently, Dr. Ann Thor is on the Executive and directs the ECOG Pathology Coordination Office. Dr. David Calls chains the Health Behavior and Practices Committee and the Outcomes Subcommittee. The CCOP has participated in approved cancer control projects in the NSABP-sponsored breast cancer prevention trial with tamoxifen, the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, and other cancer control studies. During the 5 years, 279.5 cancer control credits were awarded. ENH investigators have been active in several cancer control projects outside the CCOP pertaining to epidemiology, diagnosis, “diagnostic marker” and dietary manipulation. These include a NCI funded study of low- fat diet in post-menopausal breast cancer, and the Women’s Health Initiative, treatment of post-mastectomy arm lymphedema. The CCOP has been reorganized to increase accrual by: recruitment of new investigators, adding Swedish Covenant Hospital as an affiliate, and GOG as a research base. Efforts are underway to encompass minority enrollment. A 24-bed Clinical Pharmacology Unit sponsored by Searle is operation, with the PI on the advisory committee. We have expanded our education activities through Grand Rounds and lecture series. In the last 4 years, ENH investigators published 63 papers and 10 abstracts pertaining to clinical cancer treatment and control. A research effort in cellular and molecular biology has been developed with the establishment of a program in molecular genetics. Thus, a vertical integration, e.g., from laboratory studies to delivery of care in the local community is being sought. Support is asked for ENH’s continued participation in the CCOP. Funding is sought for continued accrual of patients to cancer therapy and cancer control studies of the ECG, NSABP, and GOG. Thus, our participation in cancer control and therapeutic trials will promoter medical advances as well as stimulate better patient care. These in turn will impact favorably on the level of knowledge of staff and physicians within the community. Since 1983, we have successfully participated in the CCOP program, and our record and proposed changes promise continued success in the future.

Tags:Cancer Prevention, Community Health Service, Human Therapy Evaluation, Neoplasm /cancer Therapy Hodgkin’s Disease, Waldenstrom’s Macroglobulinemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Antineoplastic, Bladder Neoplasm, Bone Marrow Transplantation, Brain Neoplasm, Breast Neoplasm, Breast Neoplasm /cancer Diagnosis, Cancer Pain, Cancer Registry /resource, Cancer Rehabilitation /care, Cervix Neoplasm, Chemoprevention, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Clinical Trial, Colon Neoplasm, Colorectal Neoplasm, Combination Antineoplastic Therapy, Combination Chemotherapy, Cooperative Study, Data Management, Early Diagnosis, Esophagus Neoplasm, Gastrointestinal Neoplasm, Head /neck Neoplasm, Leukemia, Lung Neoplasm, Lymphoma, Melanoma, Mesothelioma, Multiple Myeloma, Neoplasm /cancer Chemotherapy, Neoplasm /cancer Diagnosis, Neoplasm /cancer Education, Neoplasm /cancer Immunotherapy, Neoplasm /cancer Radiation Therapy, Neoplasm /cancer Surgery, Nonhodgkin’s Lymphoma, Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer, Ovary Neoplasm, Pleural Neoplasm, Prostate Neoplasm, Rectum Neoplasm, Sarcoma, Smoking Cessation, Uterus Neoplasm Clinical Research, Female, Human Subject, Male

  • Followup Grant: 7U10CA035199-16
  • Followup Grant: 5U10CA035199-17
  • Followup Grant: 5U10CA035199-18
  • Followup Grant: 5U10CA035199-19

Abstract:

  • Followup Grant: 5R01CA021327-25
  • Followup Grant: 5R01CA021327-26
  • Followup Grant: 5R01CA021327-27

Abstract:1. To review all Group protocols and concept sheets involving chemotherapy and biologic response modifiers during their preparation. 2. To introduce a program of population pharmacokinetics to a Cooperative Group setting. 3. To introduce a program of biotherapy into CALGB. 4. To review toxicities encountered during the course of Group studies. 5. To introduce new drugs and new combinations of established drugs into Group studies: in Phase II studies, and then, if indicated, Phase III comparative trials. 6. To conduct disease protocols for tumors or diseases not covered by other CALGB committees, e.g. Intergroup studies and pharmacology companion protocols. 7. To provide research symposia at Group meetings.

Tags:Drugs, Pharmacology, Biochemical, Neoplasms Of Blood And Re System, Leukemia, Acute, Neoplastic Therapy, Cancer Chemotherapy, Therapy Evaluation, Human Antibiotics, Anthracyclines, Adriamycin, Antibiotics, Bleomycin, Antineoplastic Agents, Antineoplastic Agents, Biological Response Modifiers, Drugs Adverse Effects, Drugs, Chemotherapy, Drugs Combination, Folic Acid Antagonists, Methotrexate, Metals, Heavy Metals, Platinum (compounds), Cis Platinum Compounds, Neoplasms Immunology, Neoplasms Of Body Cavities, Mesothelioma, Neoplasms Of Body Regions, Head And Neck, Neoplasms Of Reproductive System Male, Testis Neoplasms, Neoplasms Of Reproductive System, Breast Neoplasms, Neoplasms Of Reproductive System, Germ Cell Neoplasms, Pyrimidine Nucleosides, Cytosine Nucleosides, Cytosine Arabinoside, Cooperative Study Human, Clinical, Models, Mathematical

  • Followup Grant: 5U10CA044691-08

Abstract:The University of Chicago has had a major commitment to both laboratory and clinical cancer research since 1930. As part of the clinical translation of that research, University of Chicago, Section of Hematology/Oncology joined the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) in 1985. In 1987, we were awarded a five year grant to participate in CALGB activities. After averaging 50-60 patient accruals for the first several years, we accrued 142 patients in 1989, 197 in 1990 and 219 in 1991. This was accomplished by disciplined activity at the University hospital and also by establishing strong affiliated institutions in northern Illinois and Indiana. There are five main goals of this grant: 1) to achieve a patient accrual total of 300-350 patients/year by 1998; 2) to lead and assist CALGB scientific activities in the disease-related committees of respiratory (Drs. Vogelzang and Vokes) breast (Drs. Ratain and Morrow) leukemia (Dr. Larson) and lymphoma (Dr. Schilsky); 3) to lead and assist CALGB scientific activities in the modality committees of correlative science (Drs. Westbrook, Anastasi , and LeBeau), transplantation (Drs. Williams and Bitran) and pharmacology and experimental therapeutics (Drs. Schilsky and Ratain); 4) to provide clinical protocol chairmen for various future protocols; and 5) to actively assist and participate in the CALGB committees of audit, minority initiative, data management, oncology nursing, cancer control, pathology, radiotherapy and surgery. We propose to accomplish these goals by the following methods: 1) to increase accrual from the main member by increasing the numbers of leukemia, myelodysplastia, adjuvant breast and adjuvant colon cancer patients and by generating new ideas for phase I, II, and III protocols, 2) to increase accrual from affiliates by maintaining current accrual rates from our 3 major affiliates and by adding new accrual from Weiss Hospital, Lutheran General Hospital, St. Vincents Hospital and LaGrange Memorial Hospital, 3) to maintain the strong leadership roles of Drs. Ratain, Vokes, Morrow, Larson, Vogelzang, Schilsky, Westbrook, LeBeau, Anastasi, and Williams, within the CALGB, 4) to attract young investigators to the CALGB especially those with a specific laboratory expertise which can be correlated with clinical treatment or outcome, 5) to provide volunteers for the numerous CALGB administrative committees, and 6) to remain firmly committed to serving all members of our respective communities, especially serving the need of women and minorities.

Tags:Combination Antineoplastic Therapy, Combination Chemotherapy, Neoplasm /cancer Chemotherapy, Neoplasm /cancer Immunotherapy, Neoplasm /cancer Radiation Therapy, Neoplasm /cancer Surgery 13 Cis Retinoate, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Antineoplastic, Bladder Neoplasm, Breast Neoplasm, Cancer Prevention, Chromosome Translocation, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Clinical Study /trial, Colon Neoplasm, Colony Stimulating Factor, Cooperative Study, Doxorubicin, Dyserythropoietic Anemia, Human Therapy Evaluation, Immunomodulator, Interferon Alpha, Interleukin 2, Leukemia, Lymphoma, Melanoma, Mesothelioma, Multidrug Resistance, Neoplasm /cancer Diagnosis, Neoplasm /cancer Genetics, Neoplasm /cancer Pharmacology, Nonhodgkin’s Lymphoma, Oncology Nursing, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Respiratory Neoplasm, Small Cell Carcinoma Of Lung, Taxol, Testis Neoplasm, Trisomy, Vinblastine Human Subject, Minority Group, Nutrition Related Tag

  • Followup Grant: 5U10CA041287-09
  • Followup Grant: 5U10CA041287-10
  • Followup Grant: 5U10CA041287-12

Clinical Trials

Condition: Malignant Mesothelioma

Intervention: Drug: semaxanib

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Condition: Malignant Mesothelioma
Intervention: Drug: carboplatin; Drug: gemcitabine hydrochloride;
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Condition: Malignant Mesothelioma
Intervention: Drug: sorafenib tosylate
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Condition: Malignant Mesothelioma
Intervention:Drug: pazopanib hydrochloride; Other: laboratory biomarker analysis
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Condition: Malignant Mesothelioma
Intervention: Drug: vatalanib
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Condition: Malignant Mesothelioma
Intervention: Drug: cediranib maleate; Other: laboratory biomarker analysis
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Condition: Malignant Mesothelioma
Intervention: Drug: erlotinib hydrochloride
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Condition: Malignant Mesothelioma
Intervention: Drug: capecitabine
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Condition: Malignant Mesothelioma
Intervention: Drug: cisplatin; Drug: gemcitabine hydrochloride
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Condition: Malignant Mesothelioma
Intervention: Drug: cediranib maleate
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Condition: Malignant Mesothelioma
Intervention: Drug: everolimus
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Condition: Malignant Mesothelioma
Intervention: Drug: gefitinib
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Condition: Mesothelioma
Intervention: Drug: Milataxel
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Condition: Malignant Mesothelioma
Intervention: Biological: bevacizumab Drug: cisplatin; Drug: gemcitabine hydrochloride
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Condition: Lung Cancer; Malignant Mesothelioma; Pancreatic Cancer; Sarcoma
Intervention: Drug: L-alanosine
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Condition: Mesothelioma
Intervention:Drug: Erlotinib; Drug: Bevacizumab
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Condition: Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma; MPM; Solid Tumors
Intervention: Drug: pemetrexed, cisplatin and CBP501; Drug: pemetrexed and cisplatin
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Condition: Malignant Mesothelioma
Intervention: Drug: dasatinib; Other: immunoenzyme technique; Other: immunohistochemistry staining method; Other: laboratory biomarker analysis
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Condition: Mesothelioma
Intervention: Drug: Pemetrexed; Drug: Gemcitabine
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Hospitals and Cancer Centers

Dr. Hedy Lee Kindler

Director of the Mesothelioma Program
The University of Chicago Medical Center
5841 S. Maryland
Chicago, Illinois 60637
Phone: 773.702.0360
Fax: 773.702.0963

Nolan v. Weil-McLain
Docket No. 103137, SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS, April 16, 2009, Opinion Filed

Simmons v. Garces
Docket No. 91093 , SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS, January 25, 2002, Opinion Filed

McClure v. Owens Corning Fiberglas Corp
Docket Nos. 86118, 86192 Cons., SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS, October 21, 1999, Opinion Filed

Nelson v. Aurora Equip. Co.
No. 2-08-0186, APPELLATE COURT OF ILLINOIS, SECOND DISTRICT, May 29, 2009, Filed

Dukes v. Pneumo Abex Corp.
NO. 4-06-0235, APPELLATE COURT OF ILLINOIS, FOURTH DISTRICT, October 29, 2008, Filed

In re All Asbestos Litig.
Nos. 1-06-2163 And 1-06-2691 (Consolidated), APPELLATE COURT OF ILLINOIS, FIRST DISTRICT, FOURTH DIVISION, October 16, 2008, Decided

Gregory v. Beazer East
No. 1-06-3597, APPELLATE COURT OF ILLINOIS, FIRST DISTRICT, FIFTH DIVISION, July 3, 2008, Decided, July 3, 2008, Filed

Cooney & Conway v. Laconte (In re All Asbestos Litig.)
Nos. 1-06-2163 And 1-06-2691 (Consolidated), APPELLATE COURT OF ILLINOIS, FIRST DISTRICT, FOURTH DIVISION, June 5, 2008, Decided

Berry v. Am. Std., Inc.
NO. 5-06-0621, APPELLATE COURT OF ILLINOIS, FIFTH DISTRICT, May 19, 2008, Filed

Nolan v. Weil-McLain
NO. 4-05-0328 , APPELLATE COURT OF ILLINOIS, FOURTH DISTRICT, June 27, 2006, Filed

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