HITOC for Mesothelioma: Benefits May Outweigh the Risk

HITOC for mesothelioma

The benefits of a localized chemotherapy regimen known as HITOC for mesothelioma outweigh the small risk of kidney failure for most patients.  That is the conclusion of a new study published in the journal Cancers. German researchers conducted a retrospective review of the medical literature on HITOC (also called HITHOC) in pleural mesothelioma patients.  They were most interested in patients who developed kidney problems after the procedure. This is a known risk with HITOC for mesothelioma. But the study suggests that most patients benefit from this type of chemotherapy in spite of the risk. Localized Treatment Versus Systemic Treatment Pleural mesothelioma tumors start on the membrane around the lungs and are hard to treat. Once this cancer takes hold, most … Continue reading HITOC for Mesothelioma: Benefits May Outweigh the Risk »

Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Safe Both Before and After Mesothelioma Surgery

immune checkpoint inhibitor

A report presented to an international gathering of lung cancer doctors shows an immune checkpoint inhibitor can make pre-surgery chemotherapy more effective for pleural mesothelioma patients.  The report was presented at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer 2021 World Conference on Lung Cancer. The week-long virtual conference ended yesterday.  Dr. Anne Tsao of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center presented her study results. They show that mesothelioma patients may benefit from an immune checkpoint inhibitor as part of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The same drug may also be helpful as a maintenance therapy after surgery. How Does an Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Work? Immune checkpoint inhibitors are a form of immunotherapy. Immunotherapy treatments work by manipulating the immune … Continue reading Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Safe Both Before and After Mesothelioma Surgery »

Study Reveals How TTFields and Chemotherapy Fight Mesothelioma

TTFields and chemotherapy

TTFields and chemotherapy offer one of the most potent combinations against malignant mesothelioma tumors. Now a new study reveals why they work so well together.  Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields. They are delivered into the chest of mesothelioma patients with a vest-like device marketed under the brand name Optune Lua.  In 2019, a combination of TTFields and chemotherapy became the first new FDA-approved treatment for mesothelioma in 15 years.  Now, a new report in the journal Lung Cancer sheds light on the synergy between the two modes of mesothelioma treatment.  Combating Cancer with Electrical Currents The Tumor Treating Fields approach was created by Jersey-based Novocure. The technology uses electrical fields to destabilize critical … Continue reading Study Reveals How TTFields and Chemotherapy Fight Mesothelioma »

Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Plus Surgery for Pleural Mesothelioma: A Prospective Study

neoadjuvant chemotherapy

A new prospective Japanese mesothelioma study shows the potentially life-saving benefits of undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery. This has been the preferred way to treat pleural mesothelioma for many years. But most of the studies on it are retrospective. This means that researchers analyze data on mesothelioma patients who already had treatment. In many cases, they are patients who have died.  The new study is one of the few prospective studies on neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mesothelioma surgery.  In a prospective study, researchers enroll patients and follow their progress through treatment.  Pleural mesothelioma is often fatal within a few months. But ninety-five percent of the study subjects who had presurgical chemotherapy followed by an operation were still alive a year … Continue reading Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Plus Surgery for Pleural Mesothelioma: A Prospective Study »

Academic Medical Centers Extend Peritoneal Mesothelioma Survival

academic medical centers

A new published study suggests that peritoneal mesothelioma patients treated at academic medical centers survive much longer than those who get their care at community hospitals. The study was conducted by Harvard Medical School researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.  Peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare and aggressive cancer of abdominal membranes. There is no known cure. The new study compared outcomes and survival among more than 2,600 mesothelioma patients. Patients were treated at high-volume academic hospitals or community cancer centers.  The results suggest that academic medical centers consistently provide more advanced and potentially life-extending care for this complex cancer.  Experience is Critical for Mesothelioma Care Malignant mesothelioma is the name for cancers that occur on internal membranes. It … Continue reading Academic Medical Centers Extend Peritoneal Mesothelioma Survival »

New Study: PD Surgery and HITHOC for Pleural Mesothelioma

PD surgery and HITHOC

German doctors say a combination of extended PD surgery and HITHOC has produced some ‘remarkable’ results for patients with pleural mesothelioma.  Extended PD (pleurectomy with decortication) is a lung-sparing surgical procedure for people with cancer on the pleural membrane around the lungs. HITHOC is a method for infusing the area with heated chemotherapy drugs without sending those drugs through the whole body.  Together, extended PD surgery and HITHOC produced median progression-free survival of more than a year and a half for mesothelioma patients in a new German study. Their experience is the focus of a new article in the journal Respiration.  Removing and Killing Cancer Cells: The One-Two Punch Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare cancer that starts on the … Continue reading New Study: PD Surgery and HITHOC for Pleural Mesothelioma »

Comparing Second-Line Therapies for Recurrent Mesothelioma

recurrent mesothelioma

University of Pennsylvania researchers have some hopeful news for people with recurrent mesothelioma after chemotherapy: Second-line immunotherapy might increase their odds of survival. Previous studies show that recurrent mesothelioma patients who had immunotherapy lived longer than those on placebo. But doctors were not sure how second-line immunotherapy compared to second-line chemotherapy in these patients. The new study showed a clear survival advantage for those who had immunotherapy.  Coping with Recurrent Mesothelioma Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare cancer with a grim prognosis. Most people who receive a mesothelioma diagnosis start treatment with chemotherapy. A combination of Alimta (pemetrexed) and a platinum drug is the most common first-line treatment.  But even the standard-of-care rarely keeps this virulent cancer at bay for … Continue reading Comparing Second-Line Therapies for Recurrent Mesothelioma »

Treatment with Vinorelbine for Relapsed Pleural Mesothelioma

treatment with vinorelbine

A new study suggests that treatment with vinorelbine may boost progression free survival for people with relapsed malignant mesothelioma. Mesothelioma is a virulent cancer caused by exposure to asbestos. Chemotherapy is the primary first-line treatment. But this cancer almost always comes back within a few months.  Now, researchers at the UK’s University of Leicester say treatment with vinorelbine might keep mesothelioma at bay for several months longer. They presented their research at this months’ annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.  Second-Line Mesothelioma Treatments Needed Pleural mesothelioma is the most common form of mesothelioma. Tumors grow on the membrane around the lungs. The symptoms often mimic lung cancer but can be even more deadly.  Some of the healthiest … Continue reading Treatment with Vinorelbine for Relapsed Pleural Mesothelioma »

Inflammation Protein May Impact Drug Therapies for Mesothelioma

drug therapies

A protein involved in the inflammatory process could impact how patients respond to drug therapies for mesothelioma. The news comes from researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.  The team led by Joseph Testa, PhD, recently released a study of a protein called RIPK3 and its role in malignant mesothelioma.  Their research showed that people with little or no expression of RIPK3 were less sensitive to drug therapies for mesothelioma. Turning that gene back on might make tumor cells more responsive. The finding could lead to new, more powerful ways to treat this aggressive cancer.  RIPK3, Mesothelioma, and Inflammation Mesothelioma is a rare but fast-growing form of cancer that comes from asbestos exposure. Tumors grow on the tissue that … Continue reading Inflammation Protein May Impact Drug Therapies for Mesothelioma »

Tri-modality Mesothelioma Treatment Triples Survival Time in New Study

tri-modality mesothelioma treatment

A comparison of chemotherapy alone versus surgery-based tri-modality treatment for mesothelioma shows patients who take the more aggressive path tend to live much longer. Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare cancer with a poor prognosis. Many patients die within a year of diagnosis. Chemotherapy is the most common treatment. But chemotherapy alone is rarely enough to stop this aggressive cancer. Tri-modality mesothelioma treatment combines several different types of therapies. The goal is to attack mesothelioma from different angles.  Now, a new study suggests that patients who go this route triple their survival over those who choose more conservative treatment. Surgery-Based Tri-Modality Mesothelioma Treatment Pleural mesothelioma is a fast-growing malignancy on the lining around the lungs. It is almost always caused … Continue reading Tri-modality Mesothelioma Treatment Triples Survival Time in New Study »

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