Mesothelioma Risk in Canadian Firefighters and Police

Mesothelioma Risk in Canadian Firefighters and Police

Firefighters and police usually work in high-stress, complex environments. And, these environments often have known and suspected hazardous and toxic exposures. A leading cause of mesothelioma is asbestos exposure. Asbestos is toxic and cancer-causing for human beings. Asbestos causes mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases. Canadian researchers published a new study in Occupational and Environmental Medicine. This new report characterizes cancer incidence among these occupations. Firefighters vs. Police The Canadian team used an Occupational Disease Surveillance System (ODSS) to identify workers. Then they compared compensation claims to the Ontario Cancer Registry. They found 36,267 people employed as firefighters or police in Ontario. In the final analysis, there were a total of 13,642 firefighters and 22,595 police. When compared with other workers, … Continue reading Mesothelioma Risk in Canadian Firefighters and Police »

Is Asbestos Fiber Type or Concentration More Important in Mesothelioma?

Is Asbestos Fiber Type or Concentration More Important in Mesothelioma?

Malignant pleural mesothelioma is strongly associated with occupational asbestos exposure. The total asbestos fiber concentration may be associated with an increased risk of mortality. Asbestos fiber type was not as important. A new study looked at different types and concentrations of asbestos fibers in the lung tissues of mesothelioma patients. The team investigated their effects on patient mortality. Asbestos Fiber Analyses A Finnish team of scientists identified 590 patients to study. All patients had malignant pleural mesothelioma and underwent pulmonary asbestos fiber analysis. A pulmonary asbestos fiber type analysis is a special clinical test. It extracts fibers and asbestos bodies from a patient’s lung tissue. Usually, this uses a digestion-and-concentration technique. The examination may even include electron diffraction and energy-dispersive … Continue reading Is Asbestos Fiber Type or Concentration More Important in Mesothelioma? »

New Cancer Guidelines to Manage and Treat Mesothelioma

Updating Mesothelioma Cancer Guidelines from a Global Perspective

Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a type of cancer that develops from the thin layer of tissue that covers many of the body’s internal organs. Mesothelioma is a difficult disease to study on a global scale for many reasons. Yet, there has been tremendous progress in mesothelioma research over the last decade. However, current cancer guidelines are fragmented. An editorial in the Annals of Oncology recommends that new guidelines need to focus on both global and gender perspectives. Shifting Timeframes Make it Difficult to Study Mesothelioma Cases of mesothelioma are rising in some countries and falling in others. This makes it difficult to study the disease on a global level. There are a few different reasons for this global variation. First, … Continue reading New Cancer Guidelines to Manage and Treat Mesothelioma »

Preventing Malignant Mesothelioma through National Asbestos Regulation

Preventing Malignant Mesothelioma through National Asbestos Regulation

After almost 30 years, one key to preventing malignant mesothelioma is found. A national ban on asbestos in the Netherlands has shown positive effects. Results from a new study show the ban cut malignant mesothelioma incidence. Malignant mesothelioma incidence has peaked about 10 years earlier than predicted. This is after the Dutch national ban on asbestos. Mesothelioma treatment advances have led to somewhat better survival in the Netherlands. But the prognosis is still dismal. National Regulation Can Prevent Malignant Mesothelioma In 1993, a national ban on asbestos went into effect in the Netherlands. This ban was preventing malignant mesothelioma in future generations. Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive cancer. It arises from the pleura or peritoneum due to asbestos exposure. A … Continue reading Preventing Malignant Mesothelioma through National Asbestos Regulation »

Could Phlebotomy Delay Development of Mesothelioma?

development of mesothelioma

New research from Japan suggests that removing some blood from the body might offer a way to delay the development of mesothelioma in people exposed to asbestos.  Nearly all cases of malignant mesothelioma occur in people with a history of asbestos exposure. Scientists know that asbestos causes mesothelioma. But they still do not know exactly how.  What is clear is that both iron and byproducts of metabolism called reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear to play a role. Blood removal or phlebotomy can temporarily reduce iron and ROS levels.  The new report from Yasumasa Okazaki, a pathologist with Japan’s Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, details how phlebotomy in asbestos-exposed mice delayed the development of mesothelioma. It offers hope that this … Continue reading Could Phlebotomy Delay Development of Mesothelioma? »

Pleural Mesothelioma Risk Among Workers May Be Higher in Winter

pleural mesothelioma risk

A leading authority in the occupational health and safety space is warning workers to be aware that their pleural mesothelioma risk may be higher in the winter. The website Occupational Health & Safety says winter is a prime season for exposure to toxins like asbestos that can threaten respiratory health. Asbestos is the primary cause of malignant pleural mesothelioma worldwide. In a new online article, the site says the combination of dry air, colds and allergies, closed up work spaces, and poor ventilation can increase the risk for serious respiratory diseases.  Why Winter Can Be Dangerous for Workers Although anyone can get malignant mesothelioma, it is usually considered an occupational disease. People in certain kinds of jobs face a much … Continue reading Pleural Mesothelioma Risk Among Workers May Be Higher in Winter »

Mesothelioma Update: Drinking and Cancer Risk

drinking and cancer risk

A new study on the link between drinking and cancer risk may make people at risk for mesothelioma think twice about their alcohol consumption.  The new study is the latest to draw a direct line between drinking and cancer risk. According to the report released this week, more than 4 percent of new cancer cases last year were linked to alcohol use.  Asbestos exposure is the main cause of mesothelioma. But not everyone who is exposed to asbestos gets mesothelioma. Genetic factors play a role. But the new alcohol study suggests that drinking could also be a catalyst for cancer development.  The Link Between Drinking and Cancer Risk The new study was conducted by scientists from the International Agency for … Continue reading Mesothelioma Update: Drinking and Cancer Risk »

LA Woman’s Story is a Sobering Reminder to Watch for Signs of Pleural Mesothelioma

signs of pleural mesothelioma

The plight of an LA actress who found out she had lung cancer because of a COVID test is a sobering reminder to be aware of the early signs of pleural mesothelioma. The woman’s story was recently featured on the Today Show website. Fifty-nine year old Annabelle Gurwitch is a non-smoker with no known lung cancer risk factors. She and her 23-year-old child decided to get COVID tests after her child came home from college.  Although the COVID test was negative, Gurwitch writes that doctors were concerned about her persistent cough. Ongoing cough can be a one of the early signs of pleural mesothelioma, too. An X-ray revealed that Gurwitch was suffering from Stage 4 lung cancer, the most common … Continue reading LA Woman’s Story is a Sobering Reminder to Watch for Signs of Pleural Mesothelioma »

Could an Inhaled Vaccine Help Prevent Mesothelioma?

inhaled vaccine

Research at MIT suggests that an inhaled vaccine may trigger a strong immune response against infections and even cancer in the lungs. The findings could be good news for people at risk for the rare lung-related cancer, pleural mesothelioma.  Lung infections often start on mucosal membranes. So researchers developed a vaccine that binds to a protein in mucus. When they immunized mice in a way that mimics an inhaled vaccine, their lungs produced many T-cells. T-cells are immune system cells that can help fight infections and cancer.  Pleural mesothelioma is caused by exposure to asbestos. Right now, there is no way to vaccinate against it and no cure. If an inhaled vaccine could bring more T-cells to the lungs of … Continue reading Could an Inhaled Vaccine Help Prevent Mesothelioma? »

COVID-19 Fears May Lead to Delayed Mesothelioma Diagnosis

delayed mesothelioma diagnosis

Cancer experts are warning that the fear of contracting COVID-19 may result in delayed mesothelioma diagnosis and worse outcomes for some patients.  A study from the Epic Health Research Network shows that many patients delayed cancer screenings and other preventative health appointments during the pandemic.  Although the numbers have started to increase, the trend may mean that some patients have already faced a delayed mesothelioma diagnosis.  Understanding Pleural Mesothelioma Pleural mesothelioma is a fast-growing cancer on the tissue that surrounds the lungs and lines the chest wall. It is most common in people who lived or worked around asbestos.  Even in the best of times, mesothelioma is extremely difficult to diagnose. Most mesothelioma patients have very few symptoms until the … Continue reading COVID-19 Fears May Lead to Delayed Mesothelioma Diagnosis »

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