New Combination Chemotherapy Drug for Mesothelioma

New Combination Chemotherapy Drug for Mesothelioma

A recent study has found that a new drug for mesothelioma chemotherapy could improve treatment outcomes. The new drug is called abemaciclib. It works by blocking cancer cells from multiplying within the body. This helps to stop tumors from growing and spreading. The researchers in this study used cell samples from mesothelioma patients to test the drug. Their study found that adding abemaciclib to the standard chemotherapy treatment helped to stop the growth of mesothelioma cancer cells. Common Treatment Options Mesothelioma is an extremely rare cancer caused by exposure to asbestos. It affects the membranes around organs like the lungs and abdominal cavity. It takes a long time for symptoms to appear. By then, the cancer has usually become difficult … Continue reading New Combination Chemotherapy Drug for Mesothelioma »

Immune Checkpoint Therapy for Mesothelioma

Immune Checkpoint Therapy for Mesothelioma

A new study suggests that immune checkpoint therapy with nivolumab is a promising treatment for a specific type of mesothelioma. The study authors describe three cases of sarcomatoid mesothelioma being treated with nivolumab at Kyoto University Hospital in Japan. A Deadly Form of Mesothelioma There are three types of malignant pleural mesothelioma. They each respond differently to mesothelioma treatments. One of these types is sarcomatoid mesothelioma and it is the rarest type of mesothelioma. Sarcomatoid pleural mesothelioma cells are slender ovals with large or even multiple nuclei. Because these cells are spindle-shaped, this type of mesothelioma is sometimes called spindle-cell mesothelioma. Sarcomatoid mesothelioma is an especially deadly form of the disease. This type grows and spreads faster than the other … Continue reading Immune Checkpoint Therapy for Mesothelioma »

New Self-Administered Inhaled Gene Therapy Linked to Mesothelioma Survival

A team of doctors in Japan have developed a new oral inhaled gene therapy for the treatment of mesothelioma. This is a new gene therapy that mesothelioma patients can self-administer, much like an asthma inhaler. There’s new evidence that therapies that prevent cancer cells from forming new blood vessels may offer a better way to approach malignant pleural mesothelioma. Gene therapy has attracted attention in recent years. A new study suggests that inhalable gene drugs are effective treatments for asbestos-induced malignant pleural mesothelioma. Gene Therapy Treatments Mesothelioma is the most deadly of several diseases caused by asbestos exposure, including lung cancer and asbestosis. Most people who develop mesothelioma live less than a year after diagnosis. It is most common in … Continue reading New Self-Administered Inhaled Gene Therapy Linked to Mesothelioma Survival »

The First FDA-Approved Mesothelioma Drug in 15 Years

The First FDA-Approved Mesothelioma Drug in 15 Years

On October 2, 2020, the first FDA-approved mesothelioma drug in 15 years hit the market. They approved a new combination of drugs for mesothelioma. The combination of nivolumab with ipilimumab is now considered the first-line treatment. It is the go-to for adult patients with unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma. The FDA based approval on results from an open-label clinical trial. The results of a new study show outcomes of Mesothelioma patients over the last 2 years. This often was often six cycles of chemotherapy. Patient survival using this new combination of drugs was an average of 18.1 months. This was an increase from 14.1 months for patients who only received chemotherapy. More clinical pharmacology data also supported an alternative dosing regimen. … Continue reading The First FDA-Approved Mesothelioma Drug in 15 Years »

New Drug Targeting Fibrosis may Help Mesothelioma Patients

Targeting Fibrosis in Mesothelioma has Therapeutic Benefits

Targeting fibrosis has therapeutic benefits in mesothelioma. Most drugs have limited effects in difficult-to-treat cancers such as mesothelioma. Often this is because not enough of the drug can get into the tumor to generate an anti-tumor effect. Fibrosis is a common element of mesothelioma. It causes the area around the cancer to stiffen. Fibrosis acts as a barrier, stopping drugs from getting into the cancer tumor. This limits the immune system’s ability to detect and access the tumor to kill it. A new study is looking at how a family of proteins called lysyl oxidases can help solve this problem. These proteins are associated with fibrosis in many cancers, including mesothelioma. Oncologists targeting fibrosis and this protein family may improve … Continue reading New Drug Targeting Fibrosis may Help Mesothelioma Patients »

New Treatment for Malignant Mesothelioma Kills Cancer ‘From the Inside Out’

new treatment for malignant mesothelioma

The University of Vermont is about to start a first-in-human trial of a new kind of treatment for malignant mesothelioma.  The new approach involves a drug called RSO-021. The drug works differently from other cancer therapies. It blocks the ability of cancer cells to manage their own waste products. It’s developers say the new treatment for malignant mesothelioma aims to kill cancer cells from the inside out.  The concept for RSO-021 was first developed at the University of Vermont. Scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and the UK biotech company RS Oncology have tested the drug in mice with promising results.  Human trials of RSO-021 will start soon in the UK. US patients will be recruited in 2022.  … Continue reading New Treatment for Malignant Mesothelioma Kills Cancer ‘From the Inside Out’ »

Targeting Nerve Cells Might Offer New Way to Fight Mesothelioma, Other Cancers

targeting nerve cells

Israeli scientists may have found a new way to fight mesothelioma and other cancers from the inside out by targeting nerve cells.  Researchers at Technion – Israel Institute of Technology conducted the new study. It appears in the journal Science Advances.  Nerve cells called neurons help promote tumor growth. The team reasoned that targeting these tumor nerve cells with a damaging drug might slow cancer progression.  They tested the theory on triple-negative breast cancer tumors in mice. The tumors still grew but they grew much slower than the untreated tumors. The findings could have implications for other hard-to-treat cancers like malignant mesothelioma.  New Options Needed for Malignant Mesothelioma Malignant mesothelioma is one of the rarest and most treatment-resistant cancers. Many … Continue reading Targeting Nerve Cells Might Offer New Way to Fight Mesothelioma, Other Cancers »

Quinacrine for Mesothelioma? Anti-Malaria Drug May Help Patients with This Gene Mutation

quinacrine for mesothelioma

Another study on quinacrine for mesothelioma suggests that the once-popular anti-malaria drug might help a subset of patients with a particular gene mutation. Quinacrine is sold under the brand name Atabrine. It used to be the main anti-malaria drug but most doctors now prefer chloroquine.  Last fall, Penn State research on quinacrine for mesothelioma showed the drug has a “high degree of cytotoxicity” on its own. The newest study initially focused on the potential for synergistic effects of quinacrine and chemotherapy. It turns out that the drug can make cisplatin more lethal to mesothelioma cells. Further tests showed that cells with inactivated NF2 mutations were even more sensitive to quinacrine. As many as 60 percent of mesothelioma patients may have … Continue reading Quinacrine for Mesothelioma? Anti-Malaria Drug May Help Patients with This Gene Mutation »

Cancer-Fighting Gel Could “Change the Treatment Paradigm” for Mesothelioma

cancer-fighting gel

New National Cancer Institute research shows a cancer-fighting gel applied directly to the surface of a mesothelioma tumor could “change the treatment paradigm” for this troublesome cancer.  NCI researchers in Maryland developed the treatment and tested it in animals with mesothelioma tumors.  Their tests show mesothelioma tumors respond after just one application of the medication.  The authors of a new report on the treatment say surgeons could use it to enhance mesothelioma surgery. They could even use the cancer-fighting gel on its own as a stand-alone therapy.  The Challenge of Mesothelioma Tumor Shape Malignant mesothelioma is a surface malignancy. Surface malignancies are tumors that grow on the surface of other organs or tissues. In the case of mesothelioma, tumors occur … Continue reading Cancer-Fighting Gel Could “Change the Treatment Paradigm” for Mesothelioma »

Second-Line Treatment with Ramucirumab Improves Mesothelioma Survival

second-line treatment with ramucirumab

New evidence suggests that second-line treatment with ramucirumab after first-line chemotherapy may lead to longer survival in people with pleural mesothelioma.  Researchers in Italy recently published results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the drug. Ramucirumab inhibits a protein mesothelioma tumors need to form new blood vessels.  The study included 161 pleural mesothelioma patients from across Italy. Researchers gave half of them second-line treatment with ramucirumab and another drug called gemcitabine. The other half had second-line treatment with gemcitabine alone.  Results showed the ramucirumab group lived more than six months longer than those who got only gemcitabine.  Few Options for Recurrent Mesothelioma Pleural mesothelioma is an aggressive cancer with few good treatment options. Most patients start with chemotherapy with Alimta. … Continue reading Second-Line Treatment with Ramucirumab Improves Mesothelioma Survival »

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