Tag Archives: Surgery

Improving Survival in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

Improving Survival in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

Surgery to remove cancer tissue can lead to improved survival for epithelioid malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Patients with sarcomatoid or biphasic malignant pleural mesothelioma did not have the same results. This is the finding of a study that looked at patient data from the National Cancer Database. Worst Prognosis with Standard Therapies MPM is an aggressive cancer that develops in the lining of the lungs. It is caused by exposure to asbestos and is difficult to treat. There are three cell types for this type of cancer: epithelioid, sarcomatoid, and biphasic. About half of malignant mesotheliomas are epithelioid. This type tends to have better treatment outcomes. About 10% of mesotheliomas are sarcomatoid. This type generally has the worst prognosis with … Continue reading Improving Survival in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma »

Mesothelioma Breakthrough Can Spare the Diaphragm

Mesothelioma Breakthrough Can Spare the Diaphragm

A new study shows that surgery for malignant pleural mesothelioma can spare the diaphragm without reducing overall survival. This study was conducted by medical researchers from St. Bartholomew’s Hospital in the United Kingdom. Surgery for Malignant Pleural Mesothlioma Mesothelioma is a type of cancer caused by exposure to asbestos. It can take decades after asbestos exposure for the cancer to develop. It is an aggressive cancer and can be hard to treat. When the cancer grows in your lungs, it is called malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Conventional treatment for MPM may include surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. Surgery is the most invasive treatment option and not every patient is eligible for surgery. If the patient is too ill or if … Continue reading Mesothelioma Breakthrough Can Spare the Diaphragm »

Lung Scarring and Mesothelioma Surgery

Lung Scarring and Mesothelioma Surgery

Mesothelioma patients with scarring on their lungs may have more complications after surgery. Mesothelioma is a type of cancer that often affects the lungs. It is caused by exposure to asbestos. If asbestos fibers are inhaled, it can become trapped in the membrane lining the lungs. This membrane is called the pleura. The trapped asbestos fibers can irritate the pleura. Over time, this long-term irritation causes scarring of the lungs. Doctors call this “pleural thickening”. It is possible for the scar tissue to become thick enough to impair breathing. A common treatment for mesothelioma is surgery. A surgeon will remove as much of the mesothelioma tumors as possible. This is often followed by chemotherapy and radiation. Receiving surgery can be … Continue reading Lung Scarring and Mesothelioma Surgery »

Surgery for Mesothelioma: Goals and Side Effects

Surgery for Mesothelioma: Goals and Side Effects

Residual thoracic spaces occur in one-third of patients who receive surgery for mesothelioma. This is the space left after mesothelioma disease is removed from the lung. A new study by researchers in Japan details the results of an analysis of this side effect. Pleural Mesothelioma Mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer caused by exposure to asbestos. Treatment often combines surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Pleural mesothelioma is a type of cancer that develops from the thin layer of tissue that covers the lungs and chest wall. Symptoms may include shortness of breath due to fluid around the lung, chest pain, cough, and fatigue. This cancer is caused by exposure to asbestos. It can often take around 40 years for pleural … Continue reading Surgery for Mesothelioma: Goals and Side Effects »

The Link Between Surgery and Radiotherapy for Mesothelioma

The Link Between Surgery and Radiotherapy for Mesothelioma

A study from the Journal of Clinical Oncology has reviewed the link between radiotherapy and surgery. This is exciting new research in mesothelioma treatment. The study was conducted by mesothelioma experts in Australia. Malignant mesothelioma is a rare and aggressive cancer that rarely responds to a single cancer therapy. Malignant mesothelioma is almost always caused by exposure to asbestos. Usually, that happens in the workplace. Exciting New Research There is ongoing research exploring surgical options for mesothelioma. There are two common surgical procedures for mesothelioma: extrapleural pneumonectomy and pleurectomy decortication. Extrapleural pneumonectomy involves removing the lung affected by mesothelioma. Part of the diaphragm and the linings of the lung and heart are also removed. Pleurectomy decortication is a two-part surgical … Continue reading The Link Between Surgery and Radiotherapy for Mesothelioma »

New Surgery Gives Better Odds of Surviving Mesothelioma

New Surgery Gives Better Odds of Surviving Mesothelioma

A surgery that removes the lining around the lung may give patients better odds of surviving mesothelioma. The surgery is known as pleurectomy decortication (PD). And it may give better odds than extrapleural pneumonectomy (EP). These two surgical procedures are the most used procedures for resectable malignant mesothelioma. A new article in the Journal of Clinical Medicine describes an analysis of mesothelioma survival after surgery. Surgical Treatment for Mesothelioma Malignant mesothelioma is a rare and aggressive cancer that rarely responds to a single cancer therapy. Malignant mesothelioma is caused by exposure to asbestos. Usually, that happens in the workplace. Pleurectomy decortication is a two-part surgical procedure to treat mesothelioma. The first stage removes the membrane surrounding the lung. The second … Continue reading New Surgery Gives Better Odds of Surviving Mesothelioma »

Muscle Loss May Predict Surgical Complications in Mesothelioma

Muscle Loss May Predict Surgical Complications in Mesothelioma

Age-related muscle loss may be a predictor of negative mesothelioma outcomes after surgery. The news might help patients and doctors make better treatment decisions. Researchers at the University Hospital of Padova in Italy say they found a link. They connected sarcopenia—muscle loss associated with aging—to poor outcomes after surgery. The bottom line: muscle loss means more negative outcomes after surgery. Surgery for Mesothelioma Cancer Malignant pleural mesothelioma is an aggressive asbestos-related tumor with a poor prognosis. Surgery is often considered in the context of multimodality treatment. There are a variety of surgical procedures and treatments for pleural mesothelioma. HIPEC stands for hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. “Intraperitoneal” means that the treatment is placed inside the abdominal cavity. “Hyperthermic chemotherapy” means that the … Continue reading Muscle Loss May Predict Surgical Complications in Mesothelioma »

Peritoneal Mesothelioma and Palliative CRS/HIPEC Surgery

Peritoneal Mesothelioma and Palliative CRS/HIPEC Surgery

Peritoneal mesothelioma is the second most common form of asbestos cancer. Peritoneal mesothelioma affects the membrane around the abdominal organs. It can spread throughout the abdomen. Some peritoneal mesothelioma patients get good results with cytoreductive surgery. But success depends on many different factors. Surgical oncologists at the Medical College of Wisconsin are studying this question. Considering Surgery for Palliative Intent? Malignant mesothelioma is an especially aggressive cancer. The two primary types are pleural and peritoneal. Peritoneal mesothelioma used to be considered just as lethal as the more common pleural mesothelioma. But cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) have changed that. CRS involves removing as many of the cancer cells as possible. After surgery, the abdomen is cleaned with heated … Continue reading Peritoneal Mesothelioma and Palliative CRS/HIPEC Surgery »

Using CT Scans in Surgical Decision-Making in Peritoneal Mesothelioma

Using CT Scans in Surgical Decision-Making in Peritoneal Mesothelioma

Peritoneal mesothelioma is caused by asbestos. The peritoneum is the space in your abdomen that contains the intestines, the stomach, and the liver. The abdomen (peritoneum) is the second most common site of mesothelioma after the pleural (lungs and chest). Most doctors believe peritoneal mesothelioma is caused by the ingestion of asbestos fibers. Microscopic asbestos fibers become embedded in the abdomen (peritoneum). After about 20-50 years, these fibers can cause inflammation and mutations in the healthy mesothelial cells. These mutations may ultimately cause these cells to become cancerous. Thus, forming tumors in the peritoneum. Patients diagnosed with peritoneal mesothelioma may survive several or more years after diagnosis. There are long-term survivors, such as Paul Kraus. Using CT Scans to Avoid … Continue reading Using CT Scans in Surgical Decision-Making in Peritoneal Mesothelioma »

Quality of Life Similar Regardless of Pleural Mesothelioma Surgery Type

pleural mesothelioma surgery

New research suggests that the two major types of pleural mesothelioma surgery have about the same impact on patients’ quality of life afterward.  Thoracic surgeons at Switzerland’s University Hospital Zurich compared the results of 42 mesothelioma patients. Patients had either extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) or lung-sparing PD surgery between 2013 and 2017.  Patients answered questions about their health in the weeks and months after pleural mesothelioma surgery. Their answers show that, where post-surgical quality of life is concerned, it may not matter which procedure a person has.  Two Approaches to Pleural Mesothelioma Surgery Pleural mesothelioma tumors start on the membranous tissue (pleura) that surrounds the lungs. A healthy pleura is thin and flexible and expands to accommodate the lungs during respiration. … Continue reading Quality of Life Similar Regardless of Pleural Mesothelioma Surgery Type »